2012

On the street

New season style by Anne et Valentin

1st January 2012 Anne et Valentin’s new portraits were a delight to find on a press cd I received recently…they have created a photo album of stunning images of real people wearing their frames on the streets of Paris (outside the Anne et Valentin store there). This is one way to see elegance in real life. The series includes model Element in green (above), and another super well-formed optical style, the Tahiti. The images speak for themselves; the frames are oozing character, but are totally wearable. There are lots more I’d like to show, but here are two favourites. To see the full series visit www.anneetvalentin.com CN

Tahiti by Anne et Valentin

 

 

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Götti Switzerland
Hall of Frames Zurich Convention Center 12-13 September 2021

 

Face à Face Paris

Architectural Influences by Pascal Jaulent

1st January 2012 A timid winter sun is attempting to flow into the large windows that surround the spacious offices of Face à Face in Paris, where I meet Pascal Jaulent, President and Art Director. He greets me with a warm smile, much brighter than the reluctant winter sun. Jaulent is one of the founders who created Face à Face Eyewear in 1995 (Nadine Roth is Vice President and Marketing Director; designer Alyson Magee left to create her own company.) “What is so interesting about the past fifteen years, is the way that business has evolved. France, America and Canada are our most important markets, then Germany, and Great Britain, which is surprisingly close to the French outlook. Then there is Austria, with its tradition of frame manufacturing, and it has curiosity and enthusiasm – very different than the German market. They speak the same language, but it is a different culture. What is fascinating are the developing markets – Brazil, China, Russia.

“I have a financial background, and it has morphed into design, although I have always loved architecture. That is something that I shared with Alyson Magee. The basic principle of Face à Face has always been architecture, and now we also combine fashion with shapes and colours – it is very artful. When designing frames, it is important to pay attention to design, but also fashion trends. Frames are a personal object or accessory that has to be connected to fashion trends.

Senso by Face à Face

“Fashion moves quite rapidly and we have to adapt. We see a big difference in the acceptance of frames – people want more exclusive, artful designs. My work now is concentrated on the eyebrows as sculptures. I want to create bold and different. It’s a way to express and communicate the collection, and to stay avant garde. Women, especially, want to be à la mode, and up to date. My ideas come from everywhere. Sometimes I see a piece of furniture, like the Dali Sofa, which was the inspiration for the “Lips” sunglasses.”

Jaulent’s latest collection includes sunglasses in acetate and elegant fabrics, including silk and cotton. The Royal Stewart Collection, featuring the signature tartan of the House of Stewart, is a throwback to the 1970’s. “Tartan has rich decorative elements: it’s not new, but it’s timeless. We’ve had lots of global interest in this collection. I would also like to work in rubber and concrete (materials that relate to Jaulent’s inherent love of architecture) and use unexpected materials. I like to play with light, and use metallic inserts. Nature inspires me – leaves and petals.

Calas by Face à Face

“There are many more collections now than a few years ago. Frames are a personal expression, and the attention that people are paying to frames is a growing, positive trend. I want customers to say ‘this is beautiful, and my eyes smile’. I like to make people look beautiful in their glasses.” www.faceaface-paris.com JG

Hall of Frames Zurich Convention Center 12-13 September 2021
OGI Eyewear
Götti Switzerland
BLACKFIN
Tymeo by Face à Face

 

 

 

 

Klar, Darmstadt, Germany

1st January 2012 Opened in April 2011, Klar has been mentioned and recommended to Eyestylist on a number of occasions in the last months. The shop is, for me, representative of a new wave of independent eyewear shops in Europe, run by opticians who are passionate about the collections they sell, choosing handcrafted collections and small labels to propose to their customers.

Owner of Klar (meaning “clear” in German) Akram Husseini explains how he came to set up the shop: “Darmstadt is my hometown with about 150,000 citizens, just near Frankfurt. I have worked for 14 years as an optician, but it was my dream to have a small independent shop with a selection of frames from all over the world.”

These include, at present, Lunettes Kollektion, L.G.R., Robert La Roche, Kilsgaard, Oliver Goldsmith, Graz, 141 Eyewear, Garrett Leight, Reiz, and the silver aviator with grey lenses and gold aviator with green lenses (very specifically) by military frame specialists, Randolph Engineering.

“The store is like a vintage living room with a warm atmosphere. We reconstructed the whole interior, to create a shop that moves away from the traditional stark and cold optical environment. I chose furniture and a living space that is a reflection of my own taste. I like Danish classics such as Wegner, Juhl and Jalk. The seats are from Grete Jalk (1961), and we have industrial German lighting from E.Bolich The floor is covered in old-school linoleum, which adds a vintage edge and is similar to that used in old-fashioned classrooms. We had a tie display unit from the 1950s converted to display some of the glasses. We designed table tennis racket mirrors which hang on the wall”.

BLACKFIN
OGI Eyewear
MOREL par Jean Nouvel
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Tennis table racket mirrors at Klar

 

What is your philosophy for how you select frames? “A frame should not disguise a person. A good collection will grow bit by bit …it has to develop slowly. I only buy brands which I really like because that is the best way to offer them to my customers. I prefer the small, independent labels which specialize in glasses. (more…)

Karttoffelmuseum

The Museum of Potato Art, Munich

1st January 2012 The humble potato is elevated to high art at the charming Karttoffelmuseum in Munich. Actually, the history of the potato is fascinating, first appearing in Europe probably in the 16th century. Did you know there are over 1000 varieties of potato?  And nearly three hundred variations are available in Germany. “The Museum of Potato Art” is an enchanting voyage about an every day food staple: the care and cultivation, harvest, at the market – presented through art, photos, and documents. Director Barbara Kosler is enthusiastic about the museum’s activities for 2012, because it is the 300th birthday of Friedrich 11, an important King of Prussia and a potato hero. For a unique museum visit, don’t miss Kartoffelmuseum! www.kartoffelmuseum.de JG

OGI Eyewear
LINDBERG
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Hall of Frames Zurich Convention Center 12-13 September 2021
BLACKFIN