Hall of Frames (HOF), Zurich

HOF Fair goes ahead in Zurich, Switzerland

Despite continuing travel disruptions and quarantine requirements with Coronavirus spikes in Europe, some small annual trade events which take special care to present independent labels – have managed to meet in their usual locations with strict safety measures and compulsory mask wearing. Hall of Frames, Zurich, an annual fair which takes place in a former paper factory in Zurich’s Sihlcity, went ahead on 14th and 15th September 2020 with over 40 brands exhibiting, a higher number than ever due to cancellations of other established larger shows.

The HOF exhibition is a popular sociable annual meeting place for Swiss opticians and designers

The HOF organisers said that while visitor numbers were lower than usual, given the circumstances of the pandemic and new legislation brought in just before the fair making mask wearing mandatory, the fair was extremely well received by those who could be present as a means of orientation for the latest design trends, new collections and innovations to come. The team told us they look forward to welcoming friends, brands and visitors to the event in 2021 in a new venue called The Garden Rooms (new Zurich Convention Center), on 12 and 13th September 2021. Independent labels who exhibited at the fair included Lunettes ALF, Covrt Project, Falvin Eyewear from Denmark, YOUMAWO, Nirvan Javan, Didier Voirol, MYKITA, Feb31st and Parafina Eco-friendly Eyewear. For more information: www.hallofframes.ch

 

‘Enjoy Eyewear Again’

A special event in Italy for independent design brands

A new event concept by the founder of Miga Studio Eyewear (Italy) and like-minded independent eyewear brands and designers will take place on 7th September 2020 at Villa Avanzi, Lake Garda, Italy (by invitation only).

The concept is designed to bring customers and brands together again in a stunning, safe yet intimate setting, and to allow opticians access to some of the finest independent labels and their new offerings, in line with new social distancing protocols.

“We have organised an entire day dedicated to opticians who wish to discover unique eyewear with an inevitable glass of wine,” says Alessandro Fedalto of Miga Studio Eyewear who has conceived the event with others as a result of  the many cancellations of trade events through 2020, due to the global pandemic. ” 20 eyewear brands from Italy, UK, Germany, USA and Portugal will share their latest projects and designs releasing for the new season and 2021 with a group of 100 stores located within easy proximity of the stunning shores of Lake Garda and the historic location. For more details contact [email protected]

London Fashion Week 2020: first digital event

Seasonless, gender neutral, with both men’s and women’s collections and a mix of new launches – designers are adapting to new ways of working and presenting new lines online at the first virtual fashion week #LFWreset

London Fashion Week (#LFWreset) has launched today as a digital event, hosting multimedia content from designers, creatives, brand partners and other key collaborators. Described as a global meet-up point, the website is filled with content ranging from interviews and playlists and  podcasts to digital showrooms + lookbooks, webinars and designer diary “stories”, available to all who wish to be a part of it, and (uniquely) not just trade. Above: London-based Brazilian designer Joao Maraschin – New Foreigner Traveller series – the photoshoot is launched at LFW today – with photography by Lucas Fonseca – Maraschin: ” I invited Brazilian photographer Lucas Fonseca to create a collaborative series that would show both our visions of the collection adapted to the current situation.”

The event promises a new format with an official schedule of brands and shows the typical support for and dedication to young designers and emerging talent where feasible. They include Brazilian designer Joao Maraschin who launched his collection Foreigner Traveller in February 2020 with London College of Fashion. Maraschin’s new work is presented in powerful still life photography by Lucas Fonseca where the absence of models offers a poignant reminder of current restrictions and difficulties of working as we did before.

London Fashion Week takes place from 12th to 14th June from its new home at https://londonfashionweek.co.uk

To find out more about Joao Maraschin and his new collection, visit https://londonfashionweek.co.uk/designers/joao-maraschin/

www.joaomaraschin.com

 

 

To the future and back

X Terrace annual press preview – for London Hat Week

The annual X Terrace London Hat Week Preview Catwalk Show took place on 16th March at Shangri-La Hotel, at The Shard, showcasing 54 hats made by milliners from around the world.

Milliners were encouraged to use the theme ‘To the future and back‘ as a way to show their vision of the future of their hat designs. Each piece was uniquely inspired by an arrange of ideas such as sci-fi, high tech, environmentally friendly, imagined worlds, and 3D Printers.

Monique Lee Millinery – Shangri-La at The Shard

Monique Lee Millinery was inspired by Renzo Piano’s striking vertical city “The Shard” and within it, a mystical utopia Shangri-La where people will live isolated from the world happily in the future.

Amina Marie Hood’s Mosstro Orbiter

Amina Marie Hood named her hat Mosstro Orbiter which has an eco-futuristic design coexisting in nature and was inspired by the “Fly Eye Dome” designed by R. Buckminster fuller.

London Hat Week Press Preview: Circus hat by JH Milliner (Jennifer Hughes)

The Retro theme allowed milliners to show the glorious eras of the past when hats were the centerpiece of every wardrobe. Many milliners portrayed this theme through vintage fabrics, accessories such as ribbons, feathers and velvet, and by focusing on the elegant shapes and details of the 1920’s-1960’s.

X Terrace London Hat Week: ZELLI hat by Miss Haidee Millinery

The show at Shangri-La Hotel, at The Shard, featured a selection of hats from the upcoming ‘Great Hat Exhibition’, which is part of the 2020 London Hat Week. The models wore outfits selected and styled by Hector & Karger. Hairstyling was by Toni & Guy (Ilford) and makeup from AOFM Pro. The show included shoes from Stivaleria Cavallin and sculptures from Abigail Ozora Simpson. The show was also generously supported by Maxoo fashion platform, Jack Russell Jeanswear, Yooney Choi, and Katherine Elizabeth Academy, and was staffed by fashion students from Coventry University London. Photos courtesy of @xterrace.

X Terrace have announced the forthcoming launch of The Hat Circle, a website for the millinery industry to empower and connect independent milliners around the world with hat lovers everywhere.  https://www.xterrace.com/lhwmilliner

Andy Warhol, Tate Modern, London

A new exhibition of Andy Warhol’s work (12th March 2020 to 6th September 2020) at the Tate Modern, London promises a new look at the life and work of the pop art icon. Warhol (1928-87) was one of the most celebrated artists of the end of the 20th century and his life and work continue to inspire continued discussion and new interpretations. The unique nature of his work continues to inspire artists and creatives around the world.

This major retrospective, the first of its kind for almost 20 years, will feature iconic pop images of Marilyn Monroe, Coca-Cola and Campbell’s soup cans, as well as work never shown before in the UK.

Twenty-five works from his Ladies and Gentlemen series – portraits of black and Latin drag queens and trans women – are shown for the first time in 30 years. Visitors will also be able to play with his floating Silver Clouds and experience the psychedelic multimedia environment of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable, dated 1966 and featuring musical performances by The Velvet Underground.

Image above: Andy Warhol (1928 – 1987) Self Portrait 1986 – © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc / Artists Right Society (ARS) New York and DACS, London. The Andy Warhol Exhibition is organised by Tate Modern and Museum Ludwig, Cologne in collaboration with the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto and Dallas Museum of Art. For more information visit www.tate.org.uk

 

John Lennon’s glasses in London auction

Sotheby’s to auction items from across The Beatles’s career including iconic Oliver Goldsmith wire-framed sunspecs

Described by the auction house as “The most iconic sunglasses in rock and roll history”, the round metal rimmed glasses were given to Lennon for a role in the film ‘How I Won the War’ and caught on as his signature look. They later came into the possession of The Beatles’s’ chauffeur, Alan Herring, left behind in the back of his Mercedes.

John Lennon sunglasses by Oliver Goldsmith c. 1966 – owned by chauffeur Alan Herring and now going to auction

“In the summer of 1968 I had picked John up with Ringo and George in Ringo’s Mercedes and driven the boys into the office,” recalls Herring. “When John got out of the car I noticed he’d left these sunglasses on the back seat and one lens and one arm had become disconnected. I asked John if he’d like me to get them fixed for him. He told me not to worry, they were just for the look! He said he’d send out for some that fit. I never did get them mended – I just kept them as they were as John had left them.”

Archive image of model Cluj – which was available in three colours. Image by kind permission of Oliver Goldsmith Sunglasses

The glasses themselves were a version of the model ‘Cluj’ (see above) and an example with the same gold finish is still to be found in the Oliver Goldsmith Sunglasses London archive, according to Claire Goldsmith, Oliver’s great granddaughter and custodian to an extensive rare collection of Oliver Goldsmith original frames with a rich and fascinating history. Claire said: “John Lennon was renowned for his eyewear and in particular the round metal frames we made for him. To be the brand that designed them is something we are very proud of.”

An original silkscreen poster, 1200 x 905mm., c.1967, pinholes in each corner (from the Apple Boutique) – with reference to John’s iconic round eyeglasses

The Beatles sale includes a number of other curious items including the psychedelic portrait of Lennon by Larry Smart (above). Also up for sale are a semi-acoustic guitar owned by George Harrison (guide price £40,000 to £60,000), shirts worn by the band, a parking ticket, and a collection of items from the homes of The Beatles, which include a toaster.

In 2007, a pair of Lennon’s sunglasses – worn during the band’s 1966 tour of Japan –  were expected to fetch £1 million pounds, according to The Telegraph. The final amount paid for the glasses was never disclosed.  (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1559161/John-Lennons-sunglasses-sold-at-auction.html).

The Sotheby’s auction takes place online from 2pm GMT on 6th December 2019 – 13th December 2019. For more information visit www.sothebys.com . All rights reserved. Photography: @ Sotheby’s Auction House / PA

Note after publication: the frames sold for £137,500 in the auction in December 2019.

Fabienne Delvigne, Royal Milliner

“Sublimating through difference”

Celebrating the 30th anniversary of her eponymous label, a new book is launched following the unique and fascinating journey of Fabienne Delvigne, Belgian entrepreneur and milliner. The book recounts the designer’s story and many commissions for members of the royal families of Belgium, Sweden and the Netherlands, professional women, or men “with a sense of style”.

La Petite Robe Noire – Paris

“All my clients have in common a love of beauty,” says Delvigne, whose extraordinary designs are produced according to superior traditional craftsmanship in the Maison’s Brussels boudoir workshop. The creativity and modernity with which they are carefully brought to life mean that they always remain a source of surprise.

“Fabienne is a daring woman who has more than one string to her bow and who has put her fiery lust for living at the service of her art. Fabienne is a true magician!” Diane Von Fürstenberg

Daytona hat – Square

The book itself – with outstanding forwards by Diane von Fürstenberg and Stéphane Bern, tells of the designer’s many bespoke commissions and one-off projects for Royalty. It also explains more unexpected work that Delvigne has accomplished  outside millinery, including a stand design for the Biennale Interieur in Kortrijk for the Carrières du Hainaut©, the largest producer of limestone in Europe. For further details about the new book which is published by Marot S.A. Bruxelles in November 2019 (for £59.99 euros) visit the e shop at www.fabiennedelvigne.be/eshop/sublimer-par-la-difference/?lang=en. For more information on the designer visit www.fabiennedelvigne.be CN

Guo Pei couture for Fashion in Motion

20th anniversary of Fashion in Motion – Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK

Celebrating the 20th anniversary of Fashion in Motion, the V&A will be hosting a presentation by the acclaimed Chinese couturier Guo Pei. Famed for designing Rihanna’s yellow gown worn at the 2015 Met Gala, Guo Pei is one of China’s most spectacular designers, dressing celebrities, royalty and the style icons for over 20 years.

Fashion in Motion: Guo Pei will be the designer’s first ever show in the UK and will showcase looks from her AW 2019/20 Alternate Universe Couture collection inside the museum’s iconic Raphael Gallery on Friday 1st November 2019. Above: Guo Pei ‘Alternate Universe Fall-Winter 2019/20 – coming to #FashioninMotion at the V&A

Guo Pei: creative couture – ‘Alternate Universe’

Fashion in Motion is the V&A’s key fashion event enabling anyone to take a seat on the front row. Providing a platform for both established and up- and-coming designers, the regular series presents free-to-attend runway shows for the public and has previously featured Alexander McQueen, Vivienne Westwood and Yohji Yamamoto.

Guo Pei first presented her Alternate Universe collection at this year’s Paris Couture Week. The collection is based on the idea of a new universe where light and darkness co- exist, angels and demons sit next to one another and magical creatures creep out of the shadows. Combining the use of pineapple hemp fabric, Lafite embroidery and her signature three- dimensional embroidery techniques, the collection conjures up vivid images of mystical creatures from a different realm. Drawing inspiration from myths, fables, religious texts and the beauty of natural life, animal and insect motifs feature heavily throughout the collection, from the monkeys of Aesop’s Fables to the poisonous snake which lured Eve to steal the forbidden fruit.

Details: decorative Chinese embroidery

Guo Pei has established herself as one of the most inventive designers working today. Showcasing the finest of traditional Chinese craftsmanship while incorporating contemporary innovation, her designs take inspiration from myths, legends, architecture, and her cultural heritage. Free tickets will be released for the catwalk events from 21st October 2019 at

https://www.vam.ac.uk/articles/fashion-in-motion-guo-pei CN

Paris Fashion Week SS20

A little less sunshine (and fewer sunglasses on the street) but just as beautiful as ever, Paris Fashion Week’s street style looks were bold and breathtaking or deeply influenced by tradition. In eyewear, a sincere love and respect for heritage and classic couture was evident across the city with vintage designs and clean architectural shapes in muted tones being most popular with all generations. Above: Anna Dello Russo wearing an oversized mask in black. Photography by Gennaro D’Elia for Eyestylist.com.

Russian Model Alina wears thick rimmed tortoise sunglasses with leopard print

The cat’s eye continued to enjoy a spectacular showing at Paris, as in London and NYC – with all versions, from small and sleek to large or elongated worn by women – and increasingly, men too.

Elongated cat’s eyes: @kandelissa @mikhaelkale – Photo by Gennaro D’Elia

The elongated and sharply pointed cat’s eyes worn by many celebrities are still in vogue with the darker colours remaining the most elegant trend-driven statement for a striking finish or unique look – above, worn by Jessica (@kandelissa) with Mikhael Kale (SS20).

Leila Depina #PFW in small round sunnies

Metal frames have really taken off with a few particular shapes such as small rounds and ovals doing well. Our sightings of these styles indicated that this trend is strong and still growing.

Caro Daur : Valentino – photo by Gennaro D’Elia

With less rays throughout the week there was a chance to catch some models and influencers in glamorous glasses. Caroline Daur (influencer, blogger and entrepreneur – www.carodaur.com) wore a classic black cat eye with head to toe Valentino for the @maisonvalentino show by Pierpaolo Piccioli. Photography by Gennaro D’Elia exclusively for Eyestylist.com. CN

Milan Fashion Week

Synonymous with quality and chic, trendsetting style, Milan’s fashion week continues to be a mecca for luxury street style, good taste and individual dressing. Here is a sneak peek outside the SS20 catwalks by Italian photographer Gennaro D’Elia. Above: Leila Depina wears vintage Cazal – model 913, first launched in 2001.

Jessica Wang in metal rimmed sunglasses

Jessica Wang (www.notjessfashion.com) looked stunning in oval metal sunnies.

@SISSIZHANG in Gentle Monster X FENDI

Fashion buyer @SISSIZHANG wore the latest style in the Gentle Monster X FENDI collab.

Armela Jakova

Logos are worn with pride in Milan. Digital content creator and speaker Armela Jakova wore Gucci. For more photos from Milan Fashion Week visit our Instagram page @eyestylistmagazine. Photography by Gennaro D’Elia exclusively for Eyestylist.com.

Substance, Ateliers Gabriel, Belgium

A new exhibition highlighting the creative talents of Belgian artisans takes place in Brussels this month. Ateliers Gabriel proposes an opportunity to get close to some of Belgium’s most accomplished craftsmen and women with an exhibition of the recent work and presentation of a selection of tools and photographs from the workshops which explore the expertise and precision that goes into the different handmade pieces.

“A world of passion and patience, where time and attention to detail make all the difference…” Substance Exhibition

Ateliers Gabriel is a project designed to represent high calibre Belgian workshops in  ‘crafts, decorative arts and art of living’. Members of the group who will be highlighted in the exhibition include the bespoke eyewear maker Lunetier Ludovic (www.eyestylist.com/2019/01/lunetier-ludovic-brussels-belgium/), Atelier Mestdagh, makers of stained glass, Niyona, the fine leather goods specialist and furniture maker Alexandre Lowie.

Maison Johanne Riss, Rue de la grosse tour, 3, 1000 Brussels from 19-21 September 2019. For more information about Ateliers Gabriel: www.ateliersgabriel.be CN

Crafting Plastics: part of ‘Food’ at V&A

The Crafting Plastics Studio – award-winning  innovators in materials and design – are a highlight of the V&A’s latest exhibition looking at food and farming and sustainable practices for the future.
Described as a multi-sensory exhibition, there are opportunities to participate by tasting or touching items on display, and overall the exhibition features more than 70 contemporary projects, new commissions and creative collaborations by artists and designers who are working with chefs, farmers, scientists and local communities.
Part of the discussion falls on creative projects using food products in innovative ways. A central feature of this section is the extensive work of Crafting Plastics who have created a type of compostable bioplastic, named Nuatan, from corn, starch, sugar and cooking oil. Colours are achieved using natural pigments such as turmeric or coffee.
Founded in 2016 by product designer Vlasta Kubušová and production designer Miroslav Král, Crafting Plastics has achieved consistent recognition for the material from the design world owing to its extraordinary versatility (it can be injection moulded, 3d printed or blow-formed) and eco-friendly properties, which include not being harmful to fish. Their first collection (‘Collection 1’) of biocompatible biodegradable sunglasses was exhibited at Salone del Mobile Milan in 2016 and since then they have won several awards which include Forbes 30 under 30 in 2018. The most recent project, Collection 4, features a series of handmade lighting objects. For more information about Crafting Plastics visit www.craftingplastics.com
FOOD: Bigger than the Plate runs until Sunday, 20th October 2019 at the V&A, South Kensington, London. www.vam.ac.uk

Blackfin & Bocelli: Musical philanthropy

His voice, charisma and courage are recognised worldwide. Andrea Bocelli’s tenor renditions in opera and on records have charmed and captivated millions. Bocelli, (above image) completely blind since he was twelve years old, launched the Andrea Bocelli foundation that he created so people “can find energy and real opportunities to give the best of themselves expressing their potential.” The concept of the Foundation is to support and help give the most vulnerable members of society a “voice” of their own, and new opportunities.

Andrea Bocelli with Voices of Haiti

Blackfin, the fine quality creator of beautiful eyewear designed and produced in Italy, continues the company’s philanthropic work with their support of the Andrea Bocelli Foundation. Blackfin has been active with the Foundation since 2015, and has also been a long-time supporter of Voices of Haiti, an impressive and accomplished choir of sixty talented children aged between nine and fifteen, who come from some of the poorest areas of Port-au-Prince. Thanks to music, the members of the choir have found a musical way of escaping violence and poverty, working hard to develop their talent. The young music enthusiasts follow a structured course of study with tenacity and discipline, and they achieved a successful objective – together. Voices of Haiti are featured on the Maestro’s latest musical project – his album “Si” – a musical celebration of family, love, faith and hope.

Bocelli with Italian ballet dancer Carla Fracci at Teatro Del Silenzio

Blackfin commented: “It is a great honour for us to support the Andrea Bocelli Foundation, and we are particularly excited to see – and hear – the magic of these youngsters who, under the guidance of Andrea Bocelli, have been given the chance of a new life. It is a message of hope and values.” Discover more about the Foundation and Blackfin at: www.andreabocellifoundation.org www.blackfin.eu JG

 

Interior design: ‘Habitat’ by Giovanni Botticelli

Eyewear material inspires limited edition furnishings for the home

A new exhibition by Italian designer Giovanni Botticelli explores a classic Italian eyewear material by the well-known company Mazzucchelli in the design of objects for the home.

By revisiting a material he knows well, cellulose acetate, the designer combines concepts, design, and formal purity with focus on welding and bending techniques. He mixes two or more colours by joining acetate slabs through compressed acetone. Thermal bending is the technique commonly used for curved-front eyewear. The colour palette also draws on independent eyewear design, with chic clean contrasts between tan, transparent monochromes, and opaline hues.

Colour combinations in acetate

The installation resulting from this in-depth investigation is presented as a scaled transposition of architecture’s typical expressions and forms, suggesting correspondences between essential style codes and pure geometric shapes. Displayed in the gallery are wall bookcases, tables, and boxes — furnishings conceived as places where memories dwell, places meant to safeguard the precious memory of our things.

Wall mounted bookcase design by Botticelli

In Botticelli’s collection, the absolute precision of design meets experimentation to raise the material’s creative potential. The HABITAT collection was designed exclusively for SWING Design Gallery and produced in a limited and numbered edition.

The design project is supported by Mazzucchelli 1849 (www.mazzucchelli1849.it), the historic company in Castiglione Olona founded in 1849 as a small factory for the production of horn and bone combs and buttons. It went on to become a world leader in the production and distribution of cellulose acetate.

Free standing table design

About Giovanni Botticelli

Giovanni Botticelli was born in Rome in 1987. He studied Product Design at IED Rome (European Design Institute) from 2006 to 2009, focusing on eyewear design and the craft and industrial processing of ceramics, glass and sheet metal. He expanded his technical expertise through training at ENSA Limoges and Abate Zanetti Murano. Since 2009, he has worked with companies throughout Italy, designing and overseeing the production of eyewear and sunglasses for Mondelliani and other brands exhibiting at international fairs. In 2010, his design for the Oled lighting systems for PPML was chosen for the ADI Codex Lazio publication and won the competition put on by Alstom in collaboration with IED. After his thesis project, he developed products for DMG Spa’s collaborations with Schindler Group and Otis Elevator Company. In 2016, he took part in the Salone Satellite in Milan and started to work at IED as an assistant and teacher. For further details: www.swingdesigngallery.it / www.giovannibotticelli.eu CN

The exhibition is open until 31 July 2019 in Benevento, Italy. Photography by Danilo Donzelli – www.danilodonzelli.com.

AKK at Coachella: California festival fun!

Glamorous girls and glasses by Anna-Karin Karlsson sparkled at The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, celebrated in California. Rock, hiphop, indie, pop, electronic dance, continuous live music, sculptures and art – Coachella has it all. The showcase for musical artists is also a style show with photo-op outfits that often launch new trends. Fun, fashion and frolic highlighted the festival visit for Marie Rosell from the AKK Team and her friend Sofia Sandelius. “It was so much fun,” said Marie, and the girls looked ravishing in their luxurious sun specs by Anna-Karin Karlsson. Marie wears Half Moon (top image) in Japanese titanium plated with Rose Gold, and adorned with hand set crystals.

Alluring AKK designs: Miss Rosell worn by Sonia and Marie in Half Moon

Anna-Karin’s elegant, sleek adaptation of the aviator shape is worn by Sonia (left above image) enhanced with a graceful butterfly at the nose bridge, and a linear brow bar, all crafted in Japanese titanium, with Carl Zeiss sun lenses. Visit www.annakarinkarlsson.com to see more captivating designs for cruising or city life, beaches or boulevards, and fun festivals! JG

#LFWM: PFB + Far From Lost

The Barbados brand by Alicia Hartman, Peoples from Barbados joined sustainably sourced leather accessories label Far From Lost this weekend for a London Fashion Week event at the prestigious Sanderson hotel. The evening was co-hosted by Geoff K. Cooper and Chimere Cisse. Above: dinner guests / London Fashion Week Men’s (#LFWM).

Sanderson hotel / LFWM
Bajan soul: Peoples from Barbados sunglasses

Peoples from Barbados, created and designed by optical entrepreneur Alicia Hartman, was launched in 2018. The brand is committed to producing high-quality designs (made in Japan) with unique patterns and colorations and exceptional technical details that ensure a longer lifetime. The sunglasses are available in leading fashion and optical stores in New York, London, Barbados and Jamaica.

Far from Lost: sustainable leather accessories, made by hand

Far from Lost sources the world’s finest remnant leather – before it is discarded – to create limited edition wallets by hand. Set up by Michael Menninger, the label’s luxurious, sustainable designs are made by Mark Hanks using traditional artisan leatherwork techniques. Far From Lost has its headquarters in San Francisco. For more information about both collections and to purchase directly from them online, visit www.peoplesfrombarbados.com / www.wearefarfromlost.com CN

The Contemporary Indigenous

Solo Show by Athena Anastasiou, London

At the Royal Opera Arcade Gallery in London this week, a new exhibition by Athena Anastasiou offers personal insights into the true face of South America, exploring how indigenous culture and global diversity has influenced the people of today. Through interviews and portraits of many nationalities along the journey, she culminates her own visual interpretation, uniting contemporary people with their native indigenous history.

Above: The artist pictured with ‘Bringing the Past to New Horizons – Oil Wool and Acrylic Yarn on Linen’

The Heart of Cuba Oil on Circular Birch Plywood 2019

In a journey of discovery, she found vibrant people and societies far richer, more diverse, energetic and eclectic spectrum of influence than she ever imagined.

The Modern Muisca (2019)

The portraits in this series offer a vibrant expression of colour, pattern, form and texture with bold use of interwoven fabric and multicolored yarns, referencing the artisan crafts and traditions of the Latin American cultures which live on today. www.roa-galleria.com / www.athenaanastasiou.com

The Royal Opera Arcade Gallery, 1-2 Royal Opera Arcade, Pall Mall, London (until 18th May 2019).

London Craft Week 19: Scorched

An exhibition of char-coaled wood pieces by leading contemporary artists and designers, London

As part of the acclaimed London Craft Week, a festival of design, artisan craft, arts and fashion, Scorched is a new exhibition showing at the beautiful Fitzrovia Chapel in London. “My ambition is to create a densely forested installation that will silhouette against the highly figured marble and gold mosaic of the Fitzrovia Chapel”, explains gallery owner Sarah Myerscough. The display shows a collection of hand-crafted scorched objects and unique furniture pieces using traditional wood working processes, celebrating the wood material and its significance in the world of craft, art and design.

Scorched exhibition, London

“My aim is for the intrinsic and modest beauty of wood to truly shine when juxtaposed with this decadent chapel interior. The organic and imperfect against the refined and geometric, the prosaic as opposed to the rarified and the matt black against the gold, one absorbing light and the other reflecting it.”

Scorched exhibition, London

The Sarah Myerscough Gallery has long been aesthetically connected to the traditional Japanese charred wood process of Shou-Sugi-Ban. The exhibition offers an inspiring opportunity to investigate this process from a western perspective, with artists featuring who have already considered the process of scorching in practice.

Scorched exhibition, London – in the Fitzrovia Chapel

The 17 featured makers are: Max Bainbridge, Eleanor Lakelin, Sebastian Cox, Alison Crowther, David Gates and Helen Carnac, Christophe Kurtz, John Makepeace, Malcolm Martin and Gaynor Dowling, Gareth Neal, Jim Partridge and Liz Walmsley, Benjamin Planitzer, Wycliffe Stutchbury, Julian WAtts and Nic Webb. Prices range from £1,800 to £22,400. Fitzrovia Chapel, 2 Pearson Square, W1T 3BF

Photography above by Dan Weill London – www.danweillphotography.co.uk. For more details about London Craft Week which continues through to 12th May 2019 across London, visit www.londoncraftweek.com CN

Colour inspiration + design at Palermouno

Milan Design Week 2019: Palermouno renewed – concept studio focuses on chromatic research and international design

PalermoUno, the studio of Sophie Wannenes inaugaurated last November, has been filled with shapes and new artworks for Milan Design Week 2019. The exhibition – which includes limited editions and unique products have one common thread – colour that redefines spaces, choreographies, which completely change the look of the environment – give a new image to all eight rooms in the studio. The exhibition will continue through until July.

The space located in Brera confirms an original concept: each room keeps its functional connotation, revealing the desire to create a place that is in constant evolution. The product is part of the space, as well as an invitation to “please touch and bring me with you”. Attention is paid to the selection of furnishings made for PalermoUno in the customization of the shapes and in the colours and their gradients.

From 9 April the new exhibition, which will remain on display until 15 July 2019, will be accompanied by the launch of the ecommerce site Palermouno.it where it is possible to buy the objects and furnishing accessories present in the different spaces. For further details visit: www.palermouno.itImages: Andrea Pedretti CN

Livre Rare et Object d’art: Grand Palais Paris

Literature is embedded in the history of France, while French art and decorative objects are coveted worldwide. This weekend in Paris – 12th to 14th April – provides the ideal opportunity to view over a three-day period, a selection of rare books and unique drawings; portrait miniatures; furniture and porcelain; among other items, at the historical Grand Palais. Construction of the Beaux-Arts building began in 1897, and in 2000 the Grand Palais was decreed an historical monument. (Above image: Photo of Le Grand Palais by François Benedetti)

Rare books: Works of art at Livre Rare et Object d’Art in Paris Photo: François Benedetti

A structure of light steel and iron framing with reinforced concrete was amazingly innovative for the late 19th century. In these majestic surroundings, the written word becomes a work of art, and precious art objects with authentic provenance, can be viewed and admired.

Portrait miniature by Cecile Villeneuve at Galerie Jaegy-Theoleyre

The salon – now in its twelfth year – is among the cultural highlights of the French spring season. One hundred sixty exhibitors from fourteen different countries are participating in the event.

Louis XIV commode attributed to Antoine Gaudreaux presented by Henry Bertrand Collet

This weekend –  April 12th to 14th –  is a splendid and opportune occasion to partake in the French appreciation of significant books and exclusive objects d’art at the sublime Grand Palais.

Sévres porcelain sugar pot signed Aloncle François-Joseph at JM Béalu et Fils

Further details and information at www.salondulivrerare.paris JG

Marco Grassi at HOFA Gallery, London

Marco Grassi creates figurative portraits that combine realistic and abstract elements. Since the start of his career, the Italian artist has developed a  personal style which praises the identity of the female subject in the specific moment in which they are painted. Through intense female portraits, Grassi is focused on captivating the viewer, and creating a silent dialogue between the subject and audience. Above: Marco Grassi – Gold Experience 2018 – Oil on aluminium with resin

Marco Grassi 2018
In the forthcoming exhibition in London, Grassi has abandoned the element that was once his trademark style and technique: the decisive strokes which outlined his anatomic forms and lent a sense of stability to the whole of the figure, and contrasted with bold colours, blended with a spatula, and drippings to break them down and make them more subtle. His recent subjects display less certainty, which once allowed the figures to integrate themselves fully with the complex weave of colours. The background is more decisive and reflects the subjects’ facial expressions and intense silence, creating a complicity with the observer.
“Central to my forthcoming exhibition is the expressiveness of the body and my determination to portray to our younger generations a truthful and realistic picture of themselves,” says the artist. “An image that goes deeper than cultural standards and opinions of the media and discovers the inner beauty that lies beneath the surface in all human beings.”
Marco Grassi’s works have been exhibited in many solo and group exhibitions, and international fairs including Art Basel, Art Miami, SCOPE Basel and the Moscow Art Fair. He was also selected to exhibit at the opening of the Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2011.
Exhibition dates:
  • 31th March to 6th April at HOFA Gallery, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, London, SW1Y 4UY
  • 6th April to 17th April at HOFA Gallery, 58 Maddox Street (corner with New Bond Street), WIS 1AY
For further details visit http://thehouseoffineart.com/ CN

Richard Nahem: Parisian “eye” for art & attitude

Dreams do come true. Always keeping an “eye” open for opportunities, Richard Nahem, New York City former chef; caterer; events planner; producer and actor; realised a lifelong dream when he moved to Paris, where he proceeded to fulfil his inherent passion to be a photographer.

Parisian café waiters photographed by Richard Nahem

Roaming Parisian “rues” armed with enthusiasm and cameras, Nahem seeks and searches for the unexpected and unpredictable – whether landmark monuments; elegant Parisian doorways; the beauty of parks; and the marvellous play of light in Paris. “I strive to capture places and objects in a unique way that hasn’t been seen before,” says the Parisian aficionado. Nahem’s latest photos reveal the many sudden and remarkable moods of the city.

Unique variety of Parisian doors captured by Richard Nahem

Nahem has established not only a stunning photography portfolio, but also a site – www.eyepreferparis.com  – to ensure that Parisian visitors, residents and those who appreciate and celebrate Nahem’s dream, are able to keep abreast of current and culturally exciting events taking place in the City of Light.

Christmas trees at Place Vendome by Richard Nahem

For a new, fresh perspective on Paris, enjoy Richard Nahem photos currently on display at the chic Hôtel Pont Royal until 31st March www.hotel-pont-royal.com JG

Minuscule masterpieces: Majestic artistry

From the 16th Century through to the mid-19th Century, portrait miniatures were symbols of love and devotion. People eagerly wore them as pendants around their necks, or imbedded in bracelets – and even worn as ornamental brooches. Napoleon never left home without his portrait miniature of Josephine; Marie-Antoinette’s first glimpse of the future Louis XVI was a portrait miniature of the Dauphin – a flattering portrayal as a svelte young man, and not the stout boy he really was; and in Verdi’s La Traviata, as Violetta dies of tuberculosis, she gives Alfredo her young lover, a miniature with her image to remember their doomed affair. Nowadays discerning collectors seek these diminutive pedigree keepsakes. Connoisseur Thierry Jaegy – Jaegy-Theoleyre Gallery – shares his expertise, love and enthusiasm for Portrait Miniatures.(Above image: Portrait of a Lady by François Dumont which is in the Tansey Foundation Collection in Celle, Germany. Photo courtesy of Thierry Jaegy with kind permission of the Tansey Foundation)

Portrait Miniature painted by Edmé Rousseau 1846

How did you become inspired and excited about Portrait Miniatures? TJ: I discovered portrait miniatures when I was twenty years old in a “brocante” (antique show) in the small village of Sancerre in the Loire Valley. It was a miniature signed by Carteaux P.D.R (peintre du Roi – painter to the king), lost and forgotten on a dusty shelf. I was fascinated by the life in this very small portrait. The sitter seems to be waiting for me for many centuries, protected under this small fragile glass, ignored by everyone. How did this piece of art come from Versailles to be here, in the countryside, abandoned? In fact, the art of portrait miniatures is totally forgotten by French people; it’s different in England. I have great pleasure to participate with this art: to discover, reveal them, and share them. Laurent and I became passionate collectors during the past twenty years, and we made this passion our life ten years ago by starting the very first web gallery dedicated exclusively to this Art: The Gallery jaegy-theoleyre.fr

Portrait Miniature by Francois Meuret

What Portrait Miniaturists do you believe are the most significant from the 18th and 19th Centuries? It is very difficult to choose when there were so many great artists everywhere in Europe. Difficult but not too much…as one of them touches my heart above all: this artist is Francois Dumont (Top image). Even if he is not regular in the quality of portraits, he made (but he painted so many that I pardon him), he created real masterpieces with an inimitable look that Dumont gives to his sitters eyes. A seduction, a dialogue between the portraiture and the portraitist, with a particular charm that touches me so much. In French, we have an expression about this way to look with seduction in the eyes: to have a “oeil de velours” (velvet eyes). Dumont was the only one to give his models this “oeil de velours” – an additional feeling of happiness.

Portrait Miniature by British artist John Smart

Twenty-five years ago, there were International sales of Portrait Miniatures. Now there are virtually none. What has happened to the market? The age of collectors has changed: their buying habits changed too. The sales you talk about were only two times per year. Nowadays, nobody wants to wait so long for pleasure. With the Internet, collectors how have the possibility to access what they like immediately, when they want, night and day. This is the role of web galleries like e-commerce in general.

Thierry Jaegy – Portrait Miniature Connoisseur and Consultant

Are SnapChat and Instagram the 21st Century version of Portrait Miniatures? I don’t think so. Instagram, Snapchat…this is instantaneously forgotten as soon as it is published…it’s so far from the art of Portrait Miniatures. In our modern life, what has replaced Portrait Miniatures – for me – is our smartphones! We keep our pictures inside it, the small portraits of the ones we love, keep them in our pockets, to see them as soon as we need to – and this is exactly the role that Portrait Miniatures had.

Laurent Theoleyre with a selection of Portrait Miniatures

Could you please give a brief profile of the Portrait Miniature collector?  In my opinion, the time when collecting portrait miniatures was reserved for a small select group of millionaires is finished. Now it appears that collectors are younger, curious and connected…Most often rich, but not exclusively. If the last generation bought star artists like Hall, Sicardy, Smart and Isabey…the new generation discovered that we can find true little masterpieces in unsigned portrait miniatures, or in pieces signed by less famous artists. But there are also investors who discovered this precious art; easy to preserve and to travel with, whose rating grows. www.jaegy-theoleyre.fr JG

 

 

Celebrating photographer Bill Cunningham

On the streets of Manhattan, he was a familiar sight, his slim, lithe figure gliding skilfully amidst the raucous city traffic on his battered bike; trusty Nikon camera dangling from his neck. Bill Cunningham was an amazingly influential style authority and trend-spotter in the late 20th century. He was a beloved figure on the city’s streets, and in 2009, Cunningham was designated a New York living landmark. He captured the fashion icons of the day; attended museum openings and benefit dinners, in order to document the latest craze. When Bill Cunningham noted an item of fashion interest, headlines followed. (Photo above: Bill Cunningham on his bike – photographing Tziporah Salamon, 2011 Photo courtesy Antonio Alvarez)

Toni “Suzette” Cimino in New York City, 1974 New York HIstorical Society Library, Melanie Tinnelly Collection of Photographs of or by Bill Cunningham and Toni “Suzette” Cimino

Celebrating Bill Cunningham at the New York Historical Society is a wonderful tribute to his eclectic creativity, with a selection of objects, personal correspondence, photographs and ephemera that reflect his life and work. His career began as a milliner with stylish “Willian J” hats, as he described his label. On display at the museum is a beach hat – which even Cunningham described as “a bit outrageous.” His photography stint started in the 1960’s and for fifty years, he photographed and catalogued what New Yorkers wore on the streets. His favourite vantage point was 57th Street and Fifth Avenue – where gilded fashion emporiums Bergdorf Goodman, Tiffany and Bonwit Teller (until the latter was demolished) were certain to attract the “fashionistas” of the era, and Bill could capture the moment with his Nikon.

Ciel Bicycles New York City retailer, Biria Germany est. 1976 manufacturer Bicycle used by Bill Cunningham, ca. 2002 New York Historical Society, Gift of Louise Doktor,

The New York Historical Society has acquired his iconic Nikon camera; the French workers jacket that Cunningham adored for its numerous pockets; and one of his many bicycles. It is estimated that he owned at least thirty bikes over the years; frequently the bikes were stolen.

French workers Jacket worn by Bill Cunningham 2000s Cotton New York
Historical Society

A transplanted Bostonian, Cunningham evolved into the quintessential New Yorker, who was passionate about the city, art and politics. This touching tribute to Cunningham is a reminder of what a revolutionary he was at the time…and how much he is missed. Celebrating Bill Cunningham New York Historical Society Museum & Library through 9th September. www.nyhistory.org JG

Musique et esprit Marseille concerts

France flourishes with summer concerts – classical, jazz, dance, chamber music, and electronic performances. In August, a new event joins the prestigious roster – Musique et Esprit (Music and Spirit), founded by the renowned flutist Gabriel Fumet, (top image) which takes place at the Abbaye Saint-Victor de Marseille, a late Roman monastic structure. Fumet is from a musical family dynasty. His grandfather – Dynam Victor Fumet – was a prolific, accomplished composer; organist; and pianist. And…he had a passion for singing. Gabriel’s father – Raphaël – was also a composer and played several different musical instruments. Gabriel inherited this musicality, and at a young age, started to play the flute. HIs father would compose short pieces for Gabriel to play, and later he entered the elite Paris Conservatory.

Fumet’s career has seen him perform from Salzburg to Saint Petersburg. In Marseille, where his performance is 7th August, his oeuvre will include music from Bach to Rachmaninov, in conjunction with organist Jean Galard, from Beauvais Cathedral. Other concerts will feature the Saint Petersburg Choir, Renaissance music by the Energeia Ensemble, and the Sartène Men’s choir from Corsica. The port city of Marseille is a lovely Mediterranean destination. This summer presents a wonderful opportunity to blend relaxation with exceptional concerts by renowned performers. Let your heart soar! Concert dates and additional information – Musique et Esprit et La Toison d’Art www.latoisondart.com JG

Ocean Liners: Speed & Style at V&A London

The golden age of ocean travel is joyously celebrated at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London with Ocean Liners: Speed and Style. The exhibition is also in collaboration with the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and is the first time that an exploration of design and cultural impact of the ocean liner has been presented. The exhibition investigates the many aspects of liners from the architecture, engineering, and interiors to the chic lifestyle and fashion that was – in the early days of cruising – so much a part of life onboard.

Empress of Britain colour lithograph poster for Canadian Pacific Railways, J.R. Tooby, 1920-31 Victoria &Albert Museum

Included in the presentation is a poster of the Empress of Britain – a colour lithograph of the wondrous ship constructed at John Brown & Co. on Clydebank and launched in 1930. The Empress of Britain was the fastest and most luxurious ship of her time operating between Britain and Canada. This poster advertising Canadian Pacific Railways liner demonstrates how companies diversified transport networks and developed the seamless experience of modern travel. The imposing view of a looming hull in movement with its trailing smoke dramatises the sense of scale and speed, with the extreme stylisation typical of Art Deco.

Marlene Dietrich wearing a day suit by Christian Dior on-board Queen Elizabeth, arriving in New York, 21st December 1950. Getty Images

The German born actress, Marlene Dietrich, was one of the famous stars of the age and frequently crossed the Atlantic on liners. She was see wearing Dior’s “New Look” suit arriving in New York on the Queen Elizabeth. Liner companies were quick to publicise stars travelling on board, and Dietrich was often photographed wearing the very latest fashions.

Luggage previously belonging to the Duke of Windsor, Maison Goyard, 1940’s Miottel Museum, Berkeley, California

With the many travel restrictions that exist today – whether by air, land or sea – the emphasis of a different era is highlighted by the luggage that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor used to take on their travels. The elegant couple frequently travelled on liners between their adoptive homes in France and the United States, and travelled with astonishing quantities of luggage. They once boarded the SS United States with 100 pieces. The Duke’s bags were personalised with his title and yellow and red stripes.

Silk crêpe dress worn by Bernadette Arnal on the maiden voyage of Normandie, Lucien Lelong, France, 1935 Paris, Les Arts Décoratifs

The exclusive – and historic opportunity to see the latest fashions – formed an important part of celebrations during the maiden voyage. Leading French couture houses sent representatives for an on-board show, including Lelong, Callot Soeurs, Jeanne Lanvin, Madeleine Vionnet and Charles Frederick Worth. Each showed a garden party dress, a tailored ensemble and three evening gowns. The faultlessly draped red dress above was worn by Bernadette Arnal, the wife of a partner in the shipping company, Worms & Cie, on the maiden voyage of The Normandie. She was a regular client of Lelong and ordered dresses for the crossing in red, white and blue.

Silk georgette and glass beaded ‘Salambo’ dress, Jeanne Lanvin, Paris 1925. Previously owned by Miss Emilie Grigsby. Given by Lord Southborough Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Dining and dancing in the fabulous restaurants onboard was an elegant and nightly pleasure, and women dressed in resplendent couture fashion. The exquisitely beaded flapper dress above belonged to Miss Emilie Grigsby, a Kentucky-born beauty. She became a wealthy New York socialite, and regularly travelled between Europe and New York on the Olympic, Aquitania and Lusitania. An adventurous and fashionable dresser, she patronised the greatest French couturiers and was a regular client of both Paul Poiret and Jeanne Lanvin. Named ‘Salambo’, this dress evokes the exoticism of Gustave Flaubert’s 1862 novel, Salambô, and reflects the wider trend for exotic themes in the 1920’s.

Ocean Liners: Speed and Style sponsored by Viking Cruises, is a remarkable journey of a truly amazing age of travel. At the V&A through 17th June, and then the exhibition continues at V&A Dundee from 15th September to 24th February 2019. www.vam.ac.uk/oceanliners JG

Well-Dressed in Victorian Albany: 19th Century Haute Couture

Haute couture on an international scale was flourishing long before the era of globalisation. A fascinating exhibition Well-dressed in Victorian Albany: 19th Century Fashion from the Albany Institute Collection, illustrates how fashion design and changes in style evolved during the reign of the British monarch, Queen Victoria (1837-1901). (Top image:men, women and children’s fashions in a Victorian setting)

Creatively curated by Diana Shewchuk at the Institute, the galleries showcase an extraordinary selection of dresses and accessories of the era, that were purchased in Paris, and also made by skilled home seamstresses in the Upper Hudson Valley. Albany is the capital city of New York State, and Ms Shzwchuk explained: “Many of Albany’s well-to-do families went abroad either for a grand tour experience, or to have daughters presented to Queen Victoria. I think these dresses survive because they were considered masterpieces. The Institute has examples by Charles Frederick Worth; Emile Pingat; Callot Soeurs; Mme Amédée François; and others. The costumes on view tell stories of notable New Yorkers and illuminate their world of fashionable affluence.”

Luxurious materials and lace accent elegant designs in 19th Century fashion

The presentations are displayed on custom carved mannequins. “Everything is surrounded by objects from the Institute”s rich collection of paintings, furniture, and decorative arts which create scenes of nineteenth century domestic life,” noted Shewchuk, “and the addition of art and objects that were made during the Victorian era creates an atmospheric context to the exhibition.”

The vibrancy of the raspberry coloured dress (foreground) was possible with the invention by English chemist William Henry Perkins of the first aniline dye, which transformed colour in fashion.

From wedding gowns (it was Queen Victoria who popularised the idea of white as the colour choice for a wedding gown – women used to wear claret or green dresses) to walking suits, ball gowns and tea dresses, the exhibition presents a selection of extraordinary designs. Garments for both daily life and special occasions reflect the amazing, sumptuous fabrics utilised and include taffetas, shimmering silk satins, plush velvets, lace and luxurious trimmings.

Victorian atmosphere in fashion and home decor. The wicker baby carriage (background) is from the 1890’s.

“Garments like the ones in this exhibition survived because of their sentimental associations, their aesthetic beauty, and sometimes by chance, because they were put away and forgotten,” said Shewchuk. For those who appreciate and love fahsion and social history, these elegant dresses reflect the wide-ranging impact of the Industrial Revolution on the principles, technology, and social history of the time. Continues through 20 May 2018. www.albanyinstitute.org JG

Lovely Waste: Milan Design Week

WooClass – the small design focused eyewear label from near Florence was one of the highlights at Lovely Waste, Milan Design Week 2018 – a pilot project from Source, the Italian Design and Networking Agency. The project is the first in a series of events focusing on circular economy strategy, sustainability (product development  and production) and technology. The exhibition focuses on the development of design concepts using production waste, by three product designers: Alberto Ghirarello, Filippo Protasoni and Sebastian Tonelli. Above: Sebastiano Tonelli’s NOVO.

“We put the scraps of our production on the table…to stimulate the designers into working on a different type of process or product…” WooClass

NO LENSES by Alberto Ghirardello

The three designers interpreted, according to their own way of designing, in accordance with the production processes of WooClass, the re-use of the waste materials, suggesting different ways to optimize the production process and / or to make use of the material intended for waste.

Work in progress : MAKI VIEW by Filippo Protasoni
MAKI VIEW by Filippo Protasoni

What emerged is a twofold development: the creation of new accessory products and new ways to experiment with the re-use of waste in the production cycle using it as a new material from which the frames could be cut. For further information, visit WooClass: www.wooclass.com CN