The Viridi-anne x Rigards glasses

In a unique collaboration between award-winning avantgarde label Rigards and Japan’s artisan fashion designer Tomoaki Okaniwa, these silver + aluminium round glasses are among several of the works of art in the Rigards collection for 2019 – showing that the Hong-Kong based designer Ti Kwa continues on his own path of artisan craftsmanship and innovation, with ever greater achievement in the creative process and work with different, distinctive materials.

This complex small round frame is made from pure titanium and hand hammered .925 sterling silver for the nose piece, surgical steel for the temple arms and aluminium-magnesium for the interchangeable sun clip. Delicacy and character come from the signature hand worked finishes and elegant shape of the glasses which are light and refined, with a bespoke feel to each element of the design. A sophisticated nose pad design uses three different components which fit together to form the cohesive whole and unique colour combinations ensure a choice of dramatic or more subtle, depending on the individual’s style. The frame above is pictured in black (RG2001) with a white clip-on and contrasting red lens.

About The Viridi-anne: the brand was launched by Tomoaki Okaniwa in Japan in 2001. It is often described as Japanese in design, with influences from Europe. The label collaborates with many unique labels including Bocci, Mold and Daniel Andresen.

About Rigards: Rigards has become a creative leader in luxury artisan eyewear and produces frames by hand in a variety of sophisticated materials including copper, wood and buffalo horn. Rigards won the iF design award in 2018. for its aluminum-magnesium model RG0086AL. For further details visit www.rigards.com and www.viridi-anne.jp CN

Autumn choices: SoupCan tech innovation

Tavat Eyewear continues to prove that ingenious tech innovation is a lasting, winning trait in eyewear. Their SoupCan concept, launched in 2015 (at the Mido eyewear fair, Milan) and inspired by 1930s goggles, continues to achieve an ideal balance in the benefits of the “sandwich” style technical construction with rimlock closure. It also offers a completely different finish and feel to the design which is comfortable, durable and fresh in style.

An Eyestylist ‘pick’ / tech innovation: Hexad – in striped Havana

Launched in 2019, the Hexad in the Soupcan collection is offered in a range of colours suited to all tastes. They include classic matt black, bond blue horn and champagne, all beautiful and unique for the new season.

The frames are made in Italy and feature a long list of tech details from tiny watch-crown screws to comfy hypoallergenic nosepads; the metal temples are laser etched for a decorative touch and some styles benefit from ultra scratched hand finished surfaces which provide a tactile feel to the material and a subtle texture. Tavat’s frames in the SoupCan collection are the expression of a rare and innovative approach to functionality and style in product design and the refreshing aesthetic is ideally suited to those who seek something different beyond the ordinary designer frame. See more colours in the SoupCan collection at https://tavat-eyewear.com/eng/prodotto/hexad-sc041-ov / https://tavat-eyewear.com For more about Tavat click on the link: https://www.eyestylist.com/2018/10/tavat-eyewear-pantos-18k-gold/ CN

Japanese eyewear: True Vintage Revival TVR®

Introducing TVR®, an eyewear collection by skilled craftsmen from Sabae City, Fukui Prefecture, Japan

Japanese precision, tradition and artisanal craft: at the centre of the frame manufacturing region of Fukui, where artisans have worked for over 60 years in old family-owned workshops, today there are just a few traditional factories existing in Sabae who still produce handmade eyewear, and a handful of craftsmen and women of this age who continue to produce eyeglasses by hand. Some of them work exclusively with True Vintage Revival – TVR®, a small label dedicated to their extraordinary expertise through the revival of the historic “classic” shapes. Above: Artisan Yamada Mitsukazu, in his 70s, works with his wife in their traditional workshop. He has been making frames since he was 16 years old. Between them, they make around 100 frames a month.

Inside the Sabae factory where TVR® frames are produced

TVR® uses time-tested methods to create these high-quality “revival” designs as well as original tools and moulds which date from the 1920s to the 80s. They also use the  “Datum Expression Size” technique, a masterful method for measurement used during the 50s in Japan to obtain a subtle balance in the design for comfort, durability and lightness.

Craftsman Yamada Mitsukazu: one of the TVR® collections is dedicated to Yamada

In the making of the TVR® classics, vintage design features including the keyhole-bridge, functional ‘spear’ rivets, 7-barrel hinges, and other traditional spectacle details are boldly executed with skill, passed down through these generations of craftsmen whose families were responsible for starting the production of Zylonite/celluloid spectacles in the early 1950s.

Model TVR®504: a shape made famous by James Dean

Today, TVR® produces a selection of collections in Japanese zyl and SPM Sun Platinum Metal – a metal material first used in Japan in the 1930s and a favourite of the former Emperor of Japan, Hirohito. The shapes are inspired by 50 rare and collectible frames the TVR® team found discarded in an old Sabae factory. The collections include the mainline TVR Collection and “YM” – the Yamada Mitsukazu collection. For details about frames in the collections launched for 2019, visit www.tvropt.com CN

Theo x Vincent

Antwerp is a creative force for emerging young designers. The city is home to avant-garde theo eyewear, and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. The lure of Antwerp and its stylish impact convinced German born Vincent Thürstein that The Royal Academy Fashion Department was where he wanted to study. Curiosity about a tribe in the Indian Ocean living apart from outer civilisation, sparked Vincent’s concept for his catwalk collection – Mokushiroku (above image) which in Japanese means apocalypse. In a reimagined post-apocalyptic civilisation, people will be just as prone to need eyewear as we are. Vincent knocked on theo’s door, Serge Bracké responded, and a dynamic collaboration was formed.

Theo x Vincent – eyewear reimagined for a post-apocalyptic civilisation

Vincent used inspirations from Japanese fisherman, Korean female divers, Rodchenko sculptures, Marcel Breuer and other sources to create his binoculars that bear a similarity to fishermen’s diving goggles. “I wanted to combine natural materials such as horn with metal components for the constructional elements,” said Vincent, “And Serge and I worked on the oxidation processes of the frame surface in the same way as I experimented with fabrics in my collection.”

Thürstein’s fashion design and theo x Vincent eyewear

When Vincent’s fashion silhouettes appeared on the catwalk, the smart details on the outfits and the softly muted but pleasing colour palette gave a reassuring glow. Theo x Vincent eyewear added the finishing touch to Mokushiroku. For more trailblazing eyewear designs visit www.theo.be JG

Yi Wen Lim: Soft Power Mono-glass

The Mono-glass is part of RCA fashion graduate Yi Wen Lim’s SOFT POWER project (RCA 2019). SOFT POWER celebrates women at work and represents a new image of power and femininity.

RCA Fashion (Womenswear) graduate Yi Wen Lim has produced a stunning, wearable Mono-glass as part of a finals project entitled SOFT POWER.  The jewellery collection was designed in collaboration with Yi Wen Lim’s close jeweller friend Agatha (Instagram: @raccoonandbabiesofficial), and explores re-appropriating jewellery in the formal workplace. Above: Model Mercedes von Thun-Hohenstein wears Yi Wen Lim’s design 
Mono-glass worn by Mercedes von Thun-Hohenstein

Highlights in the collection include the merging of power pearls with everyday work accessories, stationery and tech wearables – these pieces include a biro pen cap ear cuff, Airpods pearl necklace, ID Badge necklace and the Mono-glass with Hair-clip.

Mono-glass by Yi Wen Lim
“The Mono-glass is inspired by work glasses that women wear, sometimes as a means to establish their intelligence and competence,” says the designer. “It is also inspired by tech accessories like the Google Glass, which perhaps can one day be integrated into more ‘aestheticised’ designs like the SOFT POWER Mono-glass,” she explains.
Mono-glass by Yi Wen Lim
Yi Wen Lim’s friend/muse Mercedes von Thun-Hohenstien (www.mercedesvonthun.com) wore the monocle design at the RCA finals presentation in London in June – and immediately caught our eye. “I found her through Instagram @mvthun21,” said Yi Wen Lim. “She is a mature model, and has been very generous with her time and support for me. She has modelled for my presentations and for video and photoshoots. We have become close over the past few months, and we are now great friends.” For more information about Yi Wen Lim’s work visit her page on Instagram – @__wenlim. Other RCA posts on Eyestylist: https://www.eyestylist.com/2016/12/rca-x-100-optical/ CN

Design Miami: See A Clean Future

The shift towards eco trends and sustainability is a continuing story in eyewear, with many new examples of eco-friendly innovations, greater sustainable focus in companies or more focused recycling endeavours in product and packaging.

One of the latest to launch is art initiative + e-commerce platform “One. All Every.” who has teamed with RVS Eyewear and Ugo Rondinone to launch See A Clean Future,  a line of colorful sustainable sunglasses, designed to raise awareness of environmental issues and climate change. The collection debuted at Design Miami in Basel Switzerland (the booth was made from wood and earth, pictured above) and is available for a limited period until June 2020.

Sunglasses designed by RVS Eyewear founder Vidal Erkohen

The frames consist of the innovative materials from the Italian Mazzucchelli company using their M49 bio-plastic, which is eco-friendly, recyclable, and biodegradable. The bioplastic is produced from cotton linters and wood fibers, which are purified into a pulp and then transformed into a resin known as M49. (www.mazzucchelli1849.it)

Sunglasses with eco-aware packaging

All metal inlays as well as temple hinges in the sunglasses are made of a recyclable stainless steel. The steel is coated with ion plating which protects the surface and allows the engraving of the frames. Ion plating is a physical vapor deposition process that uses concurrent or periodic bombardment of the substrate with aluminium, which is recyclable and non-toxic to the environment.

The sunglass lenses revert back to the traditional use of glass. According to the project directors, glass lenses are not only more environmentally sustainable but also ensure precision clarity and a refined aesthetic.

Packaging by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone

Artist Ugo Rondinone’s designs are applied to the case and box containers, which are made from recycled cardboard and eco-friendly paper, made in London. Additionally, exhibition and furniture design at Design Miami consist of non-toxic and bio materials. The project supports the work of the Jane Goodall Institute, the Green Belt Movement and the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation. For more information: www.oneallevery.com CN

Ørgreen Optics: chic fashion + innovation

With the launch of two more far-from-ordinary retro inspired sunglasses, Ørgreen Optics’ Quantum collection continues to lead us down a path of advanced fashion styling, only achievable with the solid commitment in R&D and qualitative focus of one of the leading innovator teams in modern eyewear.

Amalfi by Ørgreen: a new look for the cateye

Models Marsala and Amalfi from the Down South series are named after the popular holiday destinations stretching along the coast of the Campania region in Italy and the Sicilian province of Trapani. Their classically inspired shapes are highlighted by an ultra-cool bas relief patterning created through the high-tech 3d printing technology, while the feeling on the face is of lightness, comfort, and ease of wear.

Quantum’s impact, since its launch in 2017, has been significant at the cutting-edge of the roster of 3d printed collections – particularly in the technically focused combination of titanium with Polyamide, and its patented hinge design using a minute spherical component which connects the titanium temple to the polyamide front. The frames are available at selected opticians and in Copenhagen at the brand’s flagship store. For more details about Ørgreen Optics, visit www.orgreenoptics.com CN