Fashion illustrator: Julie @DrawPaintDesign

Fascinated by Vogue and the work of couture designers, fashion illustrator Julie McGrath says she finds inspiration in creating their intricate designs on paper. With a profound love of fashion and art, her illustrations reflect a fascination for people watching and a great love for twisting proportions. She also finds creativity and inspiration in the imaginations of her children.

Can you tell us about your background in the arts? Originally from Massachusetts, I am now living in Florida. I attended the University of Massachusetts at Boston earning a bachelor’s degree in Art focusing in Art History. From there I went on to study in Illustration and Design, earning a Master of Arts degree from Savannah College of Art and Design.

And now? I’ve completed a second Masters at SCAD, this time in Art Administration. I teach visual arts and humanities at colleges and universities, and continue to evolve and nurture my style daily.
How long have you been an illustrator? Since I could hold a pencil. But really I only started considering myself an “illustrator” over the last five or six years. That is when I found my groove and my style.

Inspiration: Chanel resort 2018

When did you develop an interest in fashion and accessories?
In college. ‘Vogue’ became much more about the artistic concepts and less about the models and the consumer side of things. I started to understand it more as a form of art. Alexander McQueen had a pretty major influence in that understanding. With my love of art and this new understanding of fashion, my style was born! It took me a number of years to get into a rhythm with my specific style.

Who is your favorite designer? Some designers that always grab my attention are Dior, Giambattista Valli, Gucci, YSL…..I could go on and on! I love what Maria Grazia Chiuri is doing with Dior. Gucci is ALWAYS fun to draw.

“Sometimes it’s just about the hair and the shades” – @drawpaintdesign

Do you have a favorite illustration? I cannot say I have a specific favorite drawing. I truly love them all in different ways. However, the most fun are always the illustrations with sunglasses. Yes, my sunnies obsession plays a factor but also those are always the best when they are finished. Those illustrations always get the most attention and reaction and people truly love them.

In terms of the illustrations, I always make it my own by reminding myself that this is my work. In college when I took fine art focused classes, the point was always to draw what you see. I had a hard time shaking that idea and it haunted me in a lot of my illustration classes and then earlier in my career. At one point it just hit me, this style of drawing is mine; I can do what I want. So when I deter from the original image and give a twist on the human form I remind myself it is my work for me. I can do whatever I want.

Instagram: @drawpaintdesign / For commissions and further information: https://www.drawpaintdesign.com CN

 

Crystal Whites – Oliver Goldsmith Decades

Capture the spirit of the 1960’s with Oliver Goldsmith’s stunning sun collection that celebrates the epic journey of the iconic British brand to herald their 90th anniversary. OG DECADES is Oliver Goldsmith’s view of the past 90 years, and features ten ravishing frames – including Crystal Whites – that reflects the joie de vie of the vibrant 1960’s. Clear crystal is timeless, and the voluminous shape is contemporary and style defining. Explore www.olivergoldsmith.com to discover exciting, eclectic styles from the striking OG Decades Collection. JG

Ocean Liners: Speed & Style at V&A London

The golden age of ocean travel is joyously celebrated at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London with Ocean Liners: Speed and Style. The exhibition is also in collaboration with the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and is the first time that an exploration of design and cultural impact of the ocean liner has been presented. The exhibition investigates the many aspects of liners from the architecture, engineering, and interiors to the chic lifestyle and fashion that was – in the early days of cruising – so much a part of life onboard.

Empress of Britain colour lithograph poster for Canadian Pacific Railways, J.R. Tooby, 1920-31 Victoria &Albert Museum

Included in the presentation is a poster of the Empress of Britain – a colour lithograph of the wondrous ship constructed at John Brown & Co. on Clydebank and launched in 1930. The Empress of Britain was the fastest and most luxurious ship of her time operating between Britain and Canada. This poster advertising Canadian Pacific Railways liner demonstrates how companies diversified transport networks and developed the seamless experience of modern travel. The imposing view of a looming hull in movement with its trailing smoke dramatises the sense of scale and speed, with the extreme stylisation typical of Art Deco.

Marlene Dietrich wearing a day suit by Christian Dior on-board Queen Elizabeth, arriving in New York, 21st December 1950. Getty Images

The German born actress, Marlene Dietrich, was one of the famous stars of the age and frequently crossed the Atlantic on liners. She was see wearing Dior’s “New Look” suit arriving in New York on the Queen Elizabeth. Liner companies were quick to publicise stars travelling on board, and Dietrich was often photographed wearing the very latest fashions.

Luggage previously belonging to the Duke of Windsor, Maison Goyard, 1940’s Miottel Museum, Berkeley, California

With the many travel restrictions that exist today – whether by air, land or sea – the emphasis of a different era is highlighted by the luggage that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor used to take on their travels. The elegant couple frequently travelled on liners between their adoptive homes in France and the United States, and travelled with astonishing quantities of luggage. They once boarded the SS United States with 100 pieces. The Duke’s bags were personalised with his title and yellow and red stripes.

Silk crêpe dress worn by Bernadette Arnal on the maiden voyage of Normandie, Lucien Lelong, France, 1935 Paris, Les Arts Décoratifs

The exclusive – and historic opportunity to see the latest fashions – formed an important part of celebrations during the maiden voyage. Leading French couture houses sent representatives for an on-board show, including Lelong, Callot Soeurs, Jeanne Lanvin, Madeleine Vionnet and Charles Frederick Worth. Each showed a garden party dress, a tailored ensemble and three evening gowns. The faultlessly draped red dress above was worn by Bernadette Arnal, the wife of a partner in the shipping company, Worms & Cie, on the maiden voyage of The Normandie. She was a regular client of Lelong and ordered dresses for the crossing in red, white and blue.

Silk georgette and glass beaded ‘Salambo’ dress, Jeanne Lanvin, Paris 1925. Previously owned by Miss Emilie Grigsby. Given by Lord Southborough Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Dining and dancing in the fabulous restaurants onboard was an elegant and nightly pleasure, and women dressed in resplendent couture fashion. The exquisitely beaded flapper dress above belonged to Miss Emilie Grigsby, a Kentucky-born beauty. She became a wealthy New York socialite, and regularly travelled between Europe and New York on the Olympic, Aquitania and Lusitania. An adventurous and fashionable dresser, she patronised the greatest French couturiers and was a regular client of both Paul Poiret and Jeanne Lanvin. Named ‘Salambo’, this dress evokes the exoticism of Gustave Flaubert’s 1862 novel, Salambô, and reflects the wider trend for exotic themes in the 1920’s.

Ocean Liners: Speed and Style sponsored by Viking Cruises, is a remarkable journey of a truly amazing age of travel. At the V&A through 17th June, and then the exhibition continues at V&A Dundee from 15th September to 24th February 2019. www.vam.ac.uk/oceanliners JG

Jean-François Rey, Créateur Lunetier

French creative designer Jean-François Rey announces the opening of a redesigned flagship store, located in Marseille in the South of France – home to the company. Two passionate young opticians take the helm of the store – Julia Maggio and Valentin Abrioux – which first opened in the French city in September 2008.

New designs by JF Rey

The shop has a new striking black facade with a new identity : ‘Jean-François Rey, Créateur Lunetier’, strengthening the link with the Jean-François Rey company, now over 30 years old with a global distribution. Inside, the shop has been completely transformed with a beautiful, chic and creative area for each of the company’s different specialists collections: JF Rey, JF Rey Petite, Kids&Teens, Boz, Volte Face, Sky Eyes, Jean-François Rey 1985 and LE CUIR.

KLEA 7099 in the VOLTE FACE collection

The company told Eyestylist: “The result is just perfect. This is the universe of designers Joëlle and Jean-François Rey! Our intention was to express the mood of each of the brands, the spirit of the designer and the House Jean-François Rey. Our customers can now see each and every one of our collections, the inspiration, and the original, creative style of our frames.”  Marseille, France CN

Vinyl eyewear at Tipton, Budapest

Majestic architecture, the river Danube and the backdrop of the Buda Hills make Budapest one of the most stunning weekend destinations in Europe. The city is also home to Hungary’s no 1 independent eyewear company Tipton Eyeworks, located in the centre of the city across the street from the historic Cafe Centrale.

A wide choice of inventive eyewear at Tipton’s showroom

Opened to the public in 2017, the showroom offers a wonderful peep at a team of industrious, highly skilled artisans finishing frames, and a buzzing retail space exhibiting the collection, where Zach Tipton’s first eyewear designs and some very special limited edition glasses – including the NVSBLE range and a tribute to Bob Marley, are on show. A highlight is the photo wall of famous faces, including Robbie Williams, Elvis Costello, Fred Durst and Elton John. “I started with rimless in early 2000, but soon moved into vinyl,” explains Zach as we toured the workshops and store. “Over the years we have perfected how we use the vinyl and we remain the only company who has pursued this direction with a growing global success in top-level boutique shops.”

Visitors to Budapest can arrange an appointment to make their own frame at the showroom, with expert artisans on hand to explain the process of assembling individual frame parts, personalising the frame with gold lettering, and, eventually cleaning and polishing the frame – ready to wear. In the background music plays from the vinyl archive on a retro ‘record player’: we play all the LPs we use for the frames, Zach explains, as he puts on a mysterious 90s ambient album that has come from a London warehouse. A current favourite is AC/DC, the focus of a collaboration using the 22 x multi-platinum “Back in Black” album.

Tipton Eyeworks showroom interior display (photo: Eyestylist)

Tipton Eyeworks has also achieved notoriety in the film industry in Budapest, producing frames for particular requirements on set, and as special commissions and gifts for the many actors and actresses visiting the city. This Spring, a Limited Edition design from the Cinematiq Collection was created for Antonio Banderas during the shooting of Genius: Life of Picasso. These unique sunglass editions are presented in a flat circular case similar to that used to carry old-school film.

Cinematiq, launched in 2018

Alongside the VINYLIZE collection launched in 2004, the new Cinematiq concept presents luxury acetate frames which make use of vintage 16mm film footage – perfectly aligned inside the temples where light illuminates the colourful action and characters within. And there is no stopping there. Whilst we were at the store, an ingenious, collaborative eco-inspired project was in production – a limited edition commission by coffee machine makers, Nespresso, recycling the aluminium coffee capsules into a chic run of co-branded sunglasses for Hungarian stores.

Eyestylist stayed at Hotel Rum, Budapest (www.hotelrumbudapest.com). Kind thanks to Tipton Eyeworks for a memorable first trip to their beautiful home city. Visit the company: TIPTON EYEWORKS, Iranyi  u. 20, 1056 Budapest www.tiptonbudapest.comwww.vinylize.com CN

Sun-sational sunnies!

Welcome summer – free from winter doldrums, and with eager anticipation of leisurely, sun-drenched days – now is the time to enjoy fabulous sunglasses. Eyewear designers cater to style/trend setters, with sunglass selections in alluring materials, shapes and colours to complement your easy-going, laid-back days. Luca Gnecchi Ruscone at L.G.R adores the Italian Rivera, and is influenced by the natural beauty of Capri for his sun specs that glow with the colours of the island. (Top image: Reunion – design purity, elegance and chic in Cappuccino from the L.G.R Capri Collection) www.lgrworld.com

RIGARDS RG0104CU “Mad Scientist” in copper

Copper is an unexpected component for eyewear, and in Ti Kwa’s talented vision it is a wonderful standout in his new collection for RIGARDS. RG0104CU – codenamed “Mad Scientist” – as it was designed in homage to the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s classic horror Frankenstein – is full of character with individual hand texturing adding an organic dimension to the frames. www.rigards.com

Rise in Bark acetate by Karmoie

The open green spaces of Norway inspire Karmoie’s beautiful design by Kirsten and Lars Iversen. They embrace summer with voluminous sunglasses in a sleek round shape. Rise in Bark is lovingly crafted in fine quality acetate with meticulous details. www.karmoie.com

Sun style variety by Plein Les Mirettes

Plein Les Mirettes in France entices with rich colourations for their impressive and dazzling variety of sun styles. Left to right: Diva 6 in exclusive colouration for PLM by Mazzucchelli; Fantasque 7 in vivid tones; Re Belle 9 in mustard – a seasonal favourite; Diva 7 in specific Mazzucchelli colours for PLM. Visit www.plein-les-mirettes.fr for additional glamorous colours and styles.

Elverfeld from the Signature Collection by Fleye Copenhagen

The exclusive Signature Collection at Fleye Copenhagen includes the sophisticated and oh so cool – Elverfeld – that combines solid and transparent layered acetate in beautiful colour combinations. Explore www.fleye.dk for additional sunglass creativity from the Danish brand.

Jimmy 9010S form the Jean-François Rey 1985 Collection

Sunshine is always a dynamic, enlightening inspiration for Marseille-based JF Rey. Jimmy 9010S is the latest innovative model in the Jean-François Rey 1985 collection – a powerful design in striking colours with a splendidly curved double-bridge. www. jfrey.fr JG

Tim Van Steenbergen + theo = Compositions

With the introduction of Compositions by Tim Van Steenbergen + theo – optics and art fuse naturally – and with exceptional distinction – into stunning, dramatic sunglasses. The Belgian duo frequently collaborates on eyewear, and the latest collection includes a third Belgian – the accomplished post-war artist, Guy Van Den Branden. Top image: Composition 1957 TVS + theo

Royal Blue distinction Composition 1958 TVS + theo

Van Steenbergen is an admirer and collector of Van Den Branden’s paintings. The artist’s geometrical abstractions focus on composition, rhythm, form and colour…the same characteristics that highlight Van Steenbergen’s visionary insights. So it was an instinctive progression that Tim pay homage to the artist’s work.

Racy Red Composition 1961 TVS + theo

There are six Compositions sunglass designs in the collection – offering an exciting harmony in titanium and acetate. The array of colours are amazing – from vivid and shiny – to mysterious darker hues – for a total of eight specialised theo-colours.

Dazzle in Composition 1963 TVS + theo

The interplay of material and colour, further enhanced with the arcs and lines that criss-cross the frames, transform recognisable shapes. The outcome is a unique ‘constructivist’ sunglass collection with highly individual composites – resulting in beautiful and impressive eyewear. Explore more at www.theo.be JG

TVS + theo Composition 1965

WOOW Eyewear: behind the brand

In 2011, the French eyewear company FACE A FACE launched a second brand, WOOW, a colourful stylish line of off-beat frames with engaging messages on the temples. Eyestylist met the young designers behind the catchy concept, Claire Ferreira and Marianne Dezes (above).

How did you come up with “WOOW” eyewear? In 2011, we had been working on the possibility of creating another brand in addition to FACE A FACE. We wanted it to be young and fresh with an accessible price. We started with the concept of the frame, and focused on the temples or arms which face each other – the original focus of FACE A FACE. We imagined them starting to chat to one another – and that was the beginning of this very different idea. We now see the WOOW label as the child of FACE A FACE.

WATCH OUT1 by WOOW Eyewear

Why WOOW? Woow is a palindrome, a fun “sound” that people use as an expression for many different things. You can say it any way you want and it is totally spontaneous. As a collection name, it works perfectly with the witty phrases on the temples. We wanted to see if we could create a new relationship with eyewear through this name, inspiring happiness, joy and hope through British inspired humour, colour and the personal touch of the words on different frame styles.

How are the frames styled? The shapes are always trendy and fashionable, for the young and the daring. The touch of colour is really specific in the combination of materials. Our inspiration came from London, but always with a strong influence, naturally, from our own French taste. One of our idiosyncratic design details – highlighting the words at the temple tips – came from the design of the old-fashioned typewriters and their classic round keys.

Make Sense1 by WOOW Eyewear

As designers, you have created something completely different. Are you pleased with the results? WOOW is like our baby, it’s a collection we adore! When we were training, we didn’t only learn about shape and colour and product design, for us designing means thinking too – and coming up with new ideas. With WOOW we had the chance to oversee all the steps, from the concept to the creation of the actual frames, giving life to a brand with an evolution that we hope our wearers will truly enjoy. you don’t just choose a frame with WOOW, it’s really about choosing a lifestyle!

Watch Out3 by WOOW Eyewear

Tell us about the styles releasing this month? The new collection includes different looks: a more “working girl” styling, through to architectural shapes and, on the other hand, some very feminine frames. Bigger trendy silhouettes and a mix of more unusual colours stand out. Our frames are tempting like sweets –  it’s difficult choose which one to go for! For more details about WOOW, visit www.wooweyewear.com CN