Eyestylist

Ultimate comfort at Ørgreen Optics

Simple, authentic styles released in comfortable, light, minimal materials

Among their many releases across collections this week, the appeal of the ultra-thin, minimalist styles in Imaginary Lines heralds a definite trend towards the ultimate comfort charged up with vibrant colours. In this line, titanium is the material of choice, and the frames feature super thin silhouettes that sit delicately and easily on the face, lightweight, and free from decoration in a pared back style that works so well. Above: Imaginary Lines series by Ørgreen Optics: model Eastern is a medium sized frame in 100% pure titanium and beta-titanium

Western: one of three new styles in the Imaginary Lines collection

Where the constructions are minimal and refined in titanium, colour and colour combinations are introduced in such a way as to bring a cool, contemporary vibe here. The company is one of the best when it comes to a palette of tones that look fresh and modern whilst also being well suited to – and enhancing – to work aesthetically on the face.

LINDBERG
MOREL par Jean Nouvel
EOE Sustainable Eyewear from Swedish Lapland
OGI Eyewear
Götti Switzerland
Oliver Goldsmith
TVR advert 2021 linked to the TVR website
Visit J.F.Rey
Bermuda: colours inspired by fashion + design trends, and redefined for the face – in matt red with matt light white gold

Model Bermuda is an excellent choice for women in this selection, produced in colour combinations such as matt brown with shiny gold or matt ice blue with shiny silver. Its lightweight look is sleek and elegant for women while the oval shape is versatile. No corners have been cut in the matching of the warm, flattering colour combinations, of which the matt red and matt light white gold is bright and well defined – yet balanced with finesse for an easy wintery upgrade that would look good for months to come. Find out more about the new styles at www.orgreenoptics.com

4 of the best: bold shades of blue

The blue tones for the season are bright, even electric

Inspired by the catwalk, street style and nature’s bounty, the new tones of blue in eyewear are intense and bold, with varieties that offer solid colour as well as transparencies and multi toned patterns. From Tuareg shades to natural ocean hues, the quality of the materials and the creative vision of the designers come together to add a dash of blue freshness and modernity to the collections – a very good alternative to the classic ‘darker’ tones we might more typically wear at this point in the year. Above: the new Finn model in the Kaleidoscope collection by Kirk & Kirk (https://kirkandkirk.com), in Italian acrylic. The colour is called “Capri”, inspired by the shores of the Mediterranean island – the material has a translucent quality

Jazzy in the Issy & LA range by Lafont Paris – an exciting patterned blue

Patterns are unequivocally a look this season in eyewear, often inspired by vintage acetate colorations as well as marbling and stone-like textures. Model Jazzy at Lafont Paris is one of the finest patterned versions we’ve spotted, mixing warm and cool tones to spectacular effect: www.lafont.com

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LINDBERG
Götti Switzerland
OGI Eyewear
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Oliver Goldsmith
Duc by Vue DC: the bevelled surfaces radiate light and colour

Model Duc is a memorable design from Vue DC, the French artisan label. The translucent blue is enhanced by the beveling of the surfaces, for an eye-catching result, as it “frames” the eyes. www.vuedc.com

© 2020 copyright protected Artworks,
Photography & Graphic Design! – theo / Matali Crasset ‘Now or never’

At theo the new ‘Now or never’ designs promote a stylish, bold mood, with elegant structures by Matali Crasset, the French artist and designer. The signature theo colour palette includes daring ‘solid’ hues of electric blue (above) as well as other brilliant brights like orange and acid green. www.theo.be

70s anyday: Vippvedel by EOE Eyewear

Step out with a bold and hippiesque style

Named after a rare flower, this new-season, attention-grabbing aviator is ideal as optical or sun style, a distinctive and expressive version of the classic shape with a unique bridge – the opening is symbolic of the shape of the rare alpine plant. Above: an on-trend look for the winter season, which welcomes eclectic influences from many different decades, including the 1970s

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Oliver Goldsmith
OGI Eyewear
Carlotta's Village
Götti Switzerland
TVR advert 2021 linked to the TVR website
Vippvedel is the name of a rare flower growing in the mountains from Härjedalen to the northernmost part of Sweden

Model Vippvedel is part of the Carved collection at sustainable design company EOE Eyewear, a line inspired by craftsmanship and classic Northern carving techniques. The effect gives a beautiful, geometric and sharp expression which for this frame is the essence of the look – a move away from the classical more rounded pilot shape. In a palette rooted in natural organic hues inspired by the terrains of Swedish Lapland, the frame comes in three colours of Northern black honey, Rosehip light bark, and Honey northern black. The sunglass versions have beautiful delicate orange gradient, gold gradient or Northern black gradient (pictured) lenses. Find out more at www.eoe-eyewear.com

Beate Leinz: “My brand is me”

Beate Leinz may not be a household name (yet), but she is responsible for designing some iconic frames in the world of eyewear – some of which provide inspiration for other brands and makers to this day. Designing for PRADA, Tom Ford and Yohji Yamamoto, Leinz has a ‘claim to fame’ or two – now she has set out on her own, to create a collection of iconic frames with her own aesthetic, for a change: LEINZ Eyewear.

What was the beginning of your journey? Did you always know you wanted to work in accessories?  Oh, I think at that time in my life the word ‘accessories’ didn’t even exist in my world; I was young, it was 1985. In terms of the ignition of my journey, I knew I had to learn a lot about design and production. After high school I started an apprenticeship as a watchmaker – I was really thrown in the deep end, learning how to fix watches with a monocle on my eye on an extremely technical level. Although the technical drawing really stood to me later in life – when I first started in eyewear this experience and background was invaluable. The technicalities in watchmaking and eyewear are not the same, but the method in which they are practiced is almost identical. I didn’t stay in watch making because… my watches never really worked! I’m not such a technical thinker, more of an aesthetic constructor. That is why goldsmithing was more my world; that’s where I went next. I worked with the jewellery designer Wilhelm T. Mattar in Cologne who I still admire deeply today. I think of him as more of an artist, he creates art in the shape of jewellery. I learned a lot from him that I practice in the creation of my frames today.

LEINZ Eyewear: attention to detail, and innovative material combinations

Would you say that you implement your learning from that period in your life into your designs now? Yes, absolutely. I think it’s more in the aesthetic rather than the technical side – the base is beauty – you bring what you feel inside and create something beautiful with it. First, you need to understand what it is, what makes something beautiful; something is beautiful when it reaches your heart – not only your eyes, like a beautiful person – it’s deeper than that. Mattar and I discussed this a lot in our work together and I still think about it when I design and create.

You’ve worked for some absolute giants in the fashion industry, tell us about your time there…Yes! I worked for Prada, Tom Ford and Yohji Yamamoto, being a part of these brands was exciting and a highlight in my life, absolutely. For Prada, I worked in a team of designers, we worked on the theme “minimal baroque” – the theme of Prada’s show that year. The team worked tirelessly to contribute to and design a pair of truly iconic frames. I complemented the spiral design on the arms with the best matching fronts. The frames ended up being sold really successfully, so much so they are still copied to this day. Of course seeing the success of my designs was a huge confidence boost; it erased any doubts I had and proved to me I was capable of creating something special. Design is a process; you have to try, try and try again to find something that is widely accepted and adored by the market, whilst still creating something innovative and new.

LEINZ Eyewear : a glam mix of acetate and 3D printed material

Was it the success of these iconic frame designs that encouraged you to start your own brand? It was and it wasn’t – I mean that in the sense that the desire to do so was always there, but of course this success brought me reassurance and confidence as I mentioned. I think it only pushed me further towards finally getting the courage to do what I had always wanted to do. Even when I was in Cologne all those years ago, I met with a producer from Denmark who created some prototypes of my designs – of course at the time I didn’t have enough money or experience to start my own brand – but the urge to do so was certainly there. I realise now the amount of work and creativity that goes into inventing a revolutionary and iconic frame. Although my earlier design successes are credited to another label, I know thats what I signed up for. You put so much into something, and then you give the work up and its gone. But I am proud of that.  All the same I feel thrilled to see my own name on my own work for a change.

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Götti Switzerland
ROLF Spectacles
Carlotta's Village
MOREL par Jean Nouvel
EOE Sustainable Eyewear from Swedish Lapland

Tell us a little about LEINZ Eyewear? I mean, to put it simply; my brand is me. There is not much else to add!

We’d love to hear a bit more about your latest collection…The inspiration for my latest collection came from my desire to “re-invent” 3D printing, giving it a bit of a “glow-up” as my daughter says. I am also in love with acetate as a material, so this provides the perfect contrast to the 3D printed material – I think contrast is necessary in all design, in materials, colours, tones and textures; that’s what my work and my design is about, it’s important to me. This collection brings that contrast to another level; the frames are deconstruct-able and they each incorporate two tones / colours, this is not something typically done in 3D printing. There are a lot of brown tones in the collection, it’s incredibly on trend at the moment and I love the colour. The structure of the frame itself has a fluctuating wave of density throughout, flowing seamlessly from lens to arm. Each section of the frame was printed as its own independent shape – endless combinations of contrasting colours. I’m eager to see how this will succeed in the market, because I love bulky frames.

In terms of sustainability, where does LEINZ Eyewear stand?  I am passionate about sustainability and the world we live in, it’s nothing other than fact to say we are part of a world that over-consumes. However, I think in the world of eyewear over-consumption is not the major problem – some people hang on to glasses for years, there isn’t as intense of a desire to keep up with trends in comparison with the rest of the fashion industry. Packaging, display props, care tools and cases is where our area of waste and destruction lies, and it is here that I am trying to create as little waste as possible within LEINZ Eyewear; our display stands and cases are made of recycled leather and are recyclable. I hope to have zero-waste surrounding my frames in the near future. For more information visit www.leinzeyewear.com. (Instagram: @leinzeyewear) This feature interview took place on Zoom after SILMO 2021. Written by Victoria G. L. Brunton exclusively for Eyestylist.com.

Creative upcycling: Lafont Paris and Inouie

The Limited Edition Inouie by Tomas Lafont of the French design house launched at SILMO this season

Richness of creativity in tandem with a sensitivity to sustainable change: the new Limited Edition Inouie by Lafont Paris was presented at SILMO this season and signifies a special step for the company as they increase the eco-friendly models in their elegant line. Named ‘inouie’ which in English means ‘unheard-of’, ‘incredible’ and ‘amazing’, the Limited Edition frame is the first example of a style which incorporates Lafont’s own archived acetates – recreated by reassembling a selection of the different colorful materials which date from the last 5-15 years, sourced in the company’s Paris archive and on the premises of the Lafont factory in the Jura. Above: the Lafont Paris stand at the memorable Silmo 2021

Limited Edition Inouie by Lafont Paris: a bold and colorful design featuring upcycled acetates from the Lafont archives

The thick-rimmed, square frame is distinctive in the assembly of different styles of acetate which include a very gentle tinted transparent material as well as rich, eye-catching decorated patterned material. Each colorway (the choices includes ‘red’, ‘yellow’ and ‘blue’) features a mix of 3 varieties of which the temple and top are up-cycled acetate.

MOREL par Jean Nouvel
BLACKFIN
essedue sunglasses
Götti Switzerland
VAVA Eyewear
OGI Eyewear
Limited Edition Inouie by Lafont Paris – a bold and creative gem – pictured in yellow paired with bright Azure blue pattern

The eco-friendly approach at Lafont was also observed in their new children’s eyewear collection, which features castor oil bio-based plastic (non toxic with 90% castor oil content) and bio-acetate materials which are lightweight, durable and free from toxins and phthalates. Find out more about the new collections at Lafont Paris by visiting www.lafont.com